Wednesday, September 21, 2005

Brad's indispensable Latin phrases

Phrases for Everyday Use:

Hocine bibo aut in eum digitos insero?
Translation: Do I drink this or stick my fingers in it?

Caupo! Etiamnunc!
Translation: Bartender, another round!

Ita erat quando hic adveni.
Translation: It was that way when I got here.

A barrus operor non recordor.
Translation: Don't think of an elephant.

Addendum: Phil disagrees with my translation for "Don't think of an elephant." Phil writes:

"Recordor", I strongly suspect, is not really the correct verb. Well, first off the obvious Latin choices here for "elephant" and "think" are elephantus and cogitare, respectively. I had to look up barrus to see that it does indeed mean "elephant," though I suspect there's some particular connotation that my dictionary doesn't reflect. As for recordor, my dictionary lists that as "to recall, recollect, remember," which is exactly what I'd expect from the obvious source verb for record. In this case though, you might not want cogitare, "to think," after all, as the meaning of the phrase is closer to "imagine." Imaginari (to imagine), putare (among other things, to think, suppose or ponder), or even ponderare (to ponder) would be better.




Phrases for Special Occasions:

Pistrix! Pistrix!
Translation: Shark! Shark!

Braccae illae virides cum subucula rosea et tunica Caledonia-quam
elenganter concinnatur.

Translation: Those green pants go so well with that pink shirt and the plaid jacket.

Ductine haec via ad Capellam Sextinam?
Translation: Is this the way to the Sistine Chapel?

Aedificium Elvis exitus.
Translation: Elvis has left the building.

7 comments:

LB said...

Brad, as usual your post addresses important issues of the day. I must disagree with the phrase about "don't think of an elephant". As you can tell from my post today, I often think about a certain ceramic elephant.

Lady K said...

My parents had to take Latin when they were in high school. When we were kids they used to speak it so we wouldn't understand what they were talking about. You've cleared it ALL up for me today, Brad. But why would they not want us to know they were talking about sharks, elephants and Elvis? LOL

Anonymous said...

Et tu, Brutus?

Ivanhoe

Brad the Gorilla said...

Parents are always in conspiracy. It's what they do.

Phil said...

I question the translation for "Don't think of an elephant." "Recordor", I strongly suspect, is not really the correct verb.

Brad the Gorilla said...

What would be your translation then, Mister Phil?

Phil said...

Well, first off the obvious Latin choices here for "elephant" and "think" are elephantus and cogitare, respectively. I had to look up barrus to see that it does indeed mean "elephant," though I suspect there's some particular connotation that my dictionary doesn't reflect. As for recordor, my dictionary lists that as "to recall, recollect, remember," which is exactly what I'd expect from the obvious source verb for record.

In this case though, you might not want cogitare, "to think," after all, as the meaning of the phrase is closer to "imagine." Imaginari (to imagine), putare (among other things, to think, suppose or ponder), or even ponderare (to ponder) would be better.